Solar FAQ’s

Getting Solar

Will a solar system always reduce my bill?

Only with the correct system design that is utilised appropriately.

I have some shading from trees. Is it worth it to still get solar?

Yes – there’s system designs and specialised equipment you can use to still get an effective solar return.

Let our Technical Team take a look at your property’s characteristics, arrange a site visit from a Qualified Solar Installer and give you a prompt, tailored assessment and quote.

My roof is not North facing. Is it worth it to still get solar?

Yes – however, its completely dependent on where you live in Australia, what the pitch of your roof is, available daily sun hours and a bunch of other factors.

Let our Technical Team take a look at your property’s characteristics, arrange a site visit from a Qualified Solar Installer and give you a prompt, tailored assessment and quote.

My roof is flat/low pitched. Can I still get solar installed?

Yes – systems on flat or low-pitched roofs can be installed on special tilts at the time of installation.

Let our Technical Team take a look at your property’s characteristics, arrange a site visit from a Qualified Solar Installer and give you a prompt, tailored assessment and quote.

How do I work out what size system I need?

The system size necessary will depend on a bunch of factors. These include:

  • Roof space
  • Number of occupants
  • Energy consumption
  • Budget

How long will my installation take?

Typically, an install will be completed in one day. Larger installs, e.g. those over 6.6kw or with switchboard works, may need to be done over 2 days. Meter change overs won’t take more than 2 hours but that’s done after the systems installed and dependent on the energy retailers workloads.

Will a qualified electrician complete my installation?

Yes – AusPac Solar takes pride in providing high quality and affordable solar installations that are completed by qualified local electricians and CEC accredited installers. We also ensure that our installers warranty their work.

What should I look for in a solar panel?

Solar systems have three main parts with panels playing a particularly important role. The solar panels you chose directly influence how much energy your system can yield so it is important to do your research to ensure you’re getting the highest quality product. It is also important to consider products with great warranty support to protect you in the event that something goes wrong.

Solar panels can be polycrystalline or monocrystalline. It doesn’t necessarily matter which option you go for as both have been tried and tested in the Australian climate.
The positioning map below should give you an idea of the panel brands currently available and how they compare based on PROVEN quality, customer service and warranty. As you can see, the panels we provide, ET and Aleo, have an above average warranty period compared to other panel brands while still being reasonably priced and offering great panel efficiency.

What is an inverter?

The second most important part of your solar installation is the inverter. This essential piece of electrical equipment is responsible for:

  • Converting DC electricity produced by the solar panels into AC electricity so that it can be used in your home or sent back to the grid
  • Maximum power point tracking – meaning that the inverter controls the voltage of your solar system to ensure that it extracts the greatest amount of energy available
  • Reporting on the performance of the system typically through Wifi

When it comes to choosing an inverter, you have two options; the most common are string inverters; less common are micro-inverter.

The main difference between the two is that string inverters are a singular DC to AC converter and are installed on a wall, then connected to your solar panels.

Micro-inverters are installed directly onto each solar panel, individually converting the DC to AC at each panel.

Both have benefits.

The positioning map below should give you an idea of the inverters currently available and how they compare based on PROVEN quality, customer service and warranty. As you can see, the inverters we provide, Goodwe, Sungrow and Huawei are reasonably priced and offer a market average warranty period.

solar inverters australia

What payment options are available?

AusPac Solar offers 3 payment methods. These payment methods are:

  • Cash
  • Credit/Debit Card
  • Financed Loan

Will I need approval from the council or any other authorities to get solar?

In most cases you will not need any approval to get solar installed but if your property is heritage listed you will need planning approval. You will also need approval from your body corporate if you live in a complex governed by a strata agreement.

How Solar Works

It’s cloudy. Will my system still generate energy?

Yes – although sunny conditions are optimal for energy yield, your system will still generate energy on a cloudy day. It is important to bear in mind that energy yield produced on a cloudy day will be much less than what is typically generated on a sunny day.

My solar is installed. What happens next?

Once your solar installation is complete, there are a few things that need to happen before it can be turned on and you can start saving.

It is the law of the grid network that your inverter remains switched off until your electricity meter has been changed or upgraded. This is done to ensure that your electricity bill is not impacted by inaccurate consumption recorded by the meter.

To get your meter changed, an Electrical Work Request or EWR needs to be submitted. An EWR lets Energex know that your installation is complete and that the Australian Standards have been applied. It will also act as your application for the feed-in tariff.

Once Energex has received the EWR, they will send a copy of it to your nominated electricity retailer and ask them for the appropriate forms, documents and information. Sometimes retailers can be slow in processing your connection request so you will need to be patient during this stage.

After processing your EWR request, Energex will send you through an EWR reference number. You will need to contact your retailer and pass on this number so that they can arrange for an electrician to upgrade your meter. Once your meter upgrade is complete and switched on, an electrician from your energy provider or Energex will switch on your system and you will be able to start saving on your power bills.

If I get solar installed, will I still need to use power from the grid?

Yes – unless you get batteries installed you will still need to rely on the grid during times when your solar system is not producing energy. Any energy produced by your solar panels during daylight hours is free electricity, but you will need to draw power from the grid at night when your solar system is not working.

If you’re looking to minimise your reliance on the grid, you should consider solar batteries. A solar battery system allows homeowners to bank excess energy generated by their solar system during the day for use during peak times thus reducing energy costs.

Will my solar system supply me with power in a power outage?

Yes and no – standard residential inverters are programmed to shut down once the grid voltage drops below a certain level. This is done to prevent emergency responders and utility repair workers from being injured while they attempt to fix the issue. Your inverter will remain shut down until the grid is running again.

But, hybrid inverters can supply backup power in the event of a power outage when paired with a solar battery. A solar battery system allows homeowners to bank excess energy generated by their solar system during the day. If you live in an area that expereiences frequent power outages then it may be a good idea to get a hybrid inverter and compatible battery so that you can use the power banked in your battery when the grid is down.

Why does my inverter turn off at night?

Many consumers get a bit worried when they check their inverter at night and it seems to have turned itself off. Not to worry – this is completely normal. Your inverter needs power from the sun to operate, so once the sun goes down it will switch itself off. It will remain switched off until the sun rises in the morning and then it will begin operating again.

Government Rebates

What Government Rebates are available?

A Federal rebate called STC’s (Small Scale Technology Certificate) is available to all certified solar equipment installed in Australia. This rebate is normally deducted off the total system cost with the remaining cost being advertised to the customer. The STC value is decreasing each year till 2030 so get in now to get the most value out of the Federal solar rebate scheme. State solar rebates are offered from time to time, however, they are subject to change. Hence, we leave to the customers discretion.

Feed-In Tariff Schemes offered by state governments also pay customers for any excess energy that is generated by the solar system but isn’t used.

Solar System Maintenance

What type of maintenance is involved once the system is installed?

We recommend half-yearly maintenance checks and panel cleaning to ensure the longevity of your system. Leaving your system for a long period of time with no maintenance can facilitate a build-up of plant matter or increase the likelihood of vermin making a home out of your system which can have catastrophic consequences as shown in the photos below.

Solar Batteries

How do solar batteries work?

Any excess solar energy generated by a solar system during the day is sold back to the energy provider for a fraction of what you’d usually pay them to buy electricity. A solar battery system allows home owners to bank excess energy generated by the solar system during the day for use during peak times thus reducing energy costs. In addition to reducing your energy costs by banking excess energy for future use, solar batteries can also save you money by:

  • Allowing you to use stored electricity during peak hours when tariffs are higher.
  • Prioritising the stored electricity in the battery over importing new electricity from the grid.